Arthington House

This is the wonderful play equipment which was funded by The Wooden Spoon

PAX_9951PAX_9957PAX_9959PAX_9974PAX_9960PAX_9962PAX_9973

We are in! This is our new school and we can’t wait to welcome the students in September.

Photo 1

Photo 2

Photo 3

Photo 4

Photo 5

Photo 6

The History

In 1886, John North gifted £6,000 to open a convalescent home in memory of his daughter Ida. This opened in May 1888. Robert Arthington financed a second hospital on the adjacent site which opened in May 1905 and took his name – Arthington House. Ida Hospital, the two crescent shaped buildings, was more commonly referred to as Cookridge Convalescent Hospital.

Cookridge Convalescent Hospital provided a place for patients who had been treated at Leeds General Infirmary to continue their recovery. Patients paid for their own care if they could afford it but there were free places available as a result of donations from benefactors – three weeks convalescence cost around 8 shillings a week.

Old Arthington 1Old Arthington 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Over the years the convalescent hospital was gradually extended, and during the First World War the building was requisitioned to care for wounded serviceman, resuming its civilian role after 1919. In 1939 when it was again taken over by the Government and briefly housed the Leeds Maternity Hospital.

The story of Cookridge Hospital as a cancer treatment centre began in 1952 when it was acquired by the Leeds Regional Hospital Board. The hospital was developed as a Regional Radiotherapy Centre using the latest technology. This required considerable adaptation of the original convalescent hospital plus a number of new buildings which were constructed on the site in the 1950s and 1960s.

The relative isolation of Cookridge from population centres was a key factor in its choice for this role in the aftermath of the Second World War. There was much concern about future air raids and the consequent danger posed to the population from the escape of the radioactive materials used in high-dose radiotherapy treatment.

The Hospital closed in 2008 when patient services were transferred to a brand new facility at St James’s Hospital in Leeds.

Arthington House is now undergoing a major refurbishment. The building form creates a naturally embracing enclosure providing a safe and secure environment for outdoor education and play.

Interventions are kept to a minimum to retain the historic fabric of the building but new large glass openings all maximum interaction with the green space to the south.

Site Plan

 

 

The following photographs were taken on January 13th and we will keep uploading new photos as the work progresses.

Website Property1

Website Property2Website Property3Website Property5Website Property6Website Property4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Plastering and window 5th March

5.3.15 Classbase 4 GC095.3.15 Main Hall5.3.15 Classbase 01 GC035.3.15 Reception from GC5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Update 25th March 2015

25.3.15 Circulation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

25.3.15 Classbase

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photos from 29th April

29.4.15 MUGA 29.4.15 Classroom29.4.15 Classroom 229.4.15 MUGA 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Class Bse 3 13.5.15Running track 1